This is a photo of Fresh caught herring at the local fishing cooperative in Freest, Germany in February 2018. (Image credit: Photo by Bernd Wüstneck/picture alliance via Getty Images)

Fresh caught herring at the local fishing cooperative in Freest, Germany in February 2018. (Image credit: Photo by Bernd Wüstneck/picture alliance via Getty Images)

We’re pleased to present a five-part series: Oceans and AI, which explores the practical application of technology to address threats to our planet’s seas and fish.

This is a photo of Fresh caught herring at the local fishing cooperative in Freest, Germany in February 2018. (Image credit: Photo by Bernd Wüstneck/picture alliance via Getty Images)

Oceans and AI: The quest for sustainable fisheries

Ocean fisheries have been in and out of trouble since the late nineteenth century when large-scale steam-powered fishing fleets first ravaged fish populations. A Royal Commission formed in 1880 placed most of the blame for the decline of fisheries in New South Wales, Australia, on “wanton” netting, in particular, its effects on small fish. Other factors it mentioned included sewage pollution and boat traffic. Sound familiar?  READ MORE

 

This photo shows An offshore ocean farming facility in Qingdao, Shandong Province of China. The 69-meter high offshore ocean farming facility can raise one and a half million fish. (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)

Oceans and AI: The new age of aquaculture

Fish farming has come a long way from its humble origins 4,000 years ago in China, when cages were used to raise carp. Two years ago, fish farming surpassed a major hurdle in human history when the amount of consumed farmed fish globally exceeded that of wild-caught fish. That threshold speaks to the important role of aquaculture in feeding people. Fish farming is now the fastest-growing animal-food production sector in the world, according to a United Nations reportREAD MORE

 

This photo shows Art installation made of about 40,000 waste plastic bottles collected from the beach in China's Shandong province Saturday. The installation is 9.1 meter long and 5.6 meter wide. (Photo credit: Feature China / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

Oceans and AI: Consumers demand sustainable fisheries

The global demand for fish is on the rise as more consumers recognize its nutritional benefits. But many of these same consumers are increasingly wary about the environmental impacts of overfishing and the overall health of the ocean.  They want to know the source of their seafood — down to its habitat and food source, and whether the fishing practices which brought it to them are sustainable or harmful to the environment.  READ MORE

 

Oceans and AI: Smarter supply chains

Economists and forecasters love to wax on and on about the complexity of global supply chains involving intricate interdependencies and a wide range of actors spread across major industrial regions, all of them needing to communicate and feed one other information. And there’s perhaps no better example than the global supply chain for ocean fisheries.  READ MORE

 

This is a photo of A plate of sardines, potatoes, and salad at Restaurante Adega de Sao Roque in Lisbon, Portugal. (Photo by: Jeffrey Greenberg/UIG via Getty Images)

Oceans and AI: From sea to table

Most fishers, marketers, and consumers know all too well that seafood is highly perishable. Once pulled from the ocean, it’s very difficult to control the look, texture, and overall quality of fish and shellfish. Harvest methods, amount of processing, and distance from sea to table are just some of the factors that determine shelf life. In fact, the amount of fish that is eaten in the world equals the amount that is thrown away.  READ MORE

 

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